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? we'll have analysis from raj rajaratnam of the "washington post." eric schmitt of the "new york times." and cbs news state department correspondent margaret brennan. and we'll look at another story that rocked washington, the sale of the "washington post". we'll talk about the future of newspapers with former "washington post" editor len downie. former "new york times" editor bill keller. and john harris, editor in chief of politico. there's a lot to cover, but this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again, michael hayden who served as both the c.i.a. and n.s.a. director now consulted for the cherdov group here in washington, joins us as our lead guest this morning. general, the president made that news conference on friday, and he said the american people need to know more about what the national security agency is doing because there are a growing number of people in the congress who are wondering is the n.s.a. infringing on americans' right to privacy? what do you think-
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial, and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to celebrate that historic event. >>> we start in syria where the government is now accusing rebel forces of using chemical weapons. the claim comes as president obama meets with his national security team at the white house to talk about the reports of chemical weapons attacks by the syrian government. syrian state tv says soldiers found chemical weapons in tunnels used by rebels. cnn cannot confirm those claims or the authenticity of these images. the opposition claims government forces launched a nerve gas attack, killing hundreds of civilians. meanwhile a top u.n. official is in damascus today asking to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons by the syrian government. president obama sat down with our chris kuomo earlier and he said the u.s. is still gathering information on the attack. >> what we've seen indicates that this is clearly a big event of grave concern. and we are already in communications with the entire international community. we're moving through the u.n. t
. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. ♪ >> people of all races, regular people from all walks of life, marching against injustice, marching to change history. >> we are the moral revolution. >> how long? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to ask and a call for peace. a word that inspired a people, a nation and the entire world. >> free at least, free at least. thank god almighty we are free at least. >> tonight a special hour-hour toll particulars nation. the march on washington. the dream continues. >>> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. first years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am right now watching history. millions more watching at home, seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement. call for justice and equality. i talked to him from the exact spot where he can spoke 50 years ago. and we'll hear some of the young people who traveled hundreds of miles to help change the course of history. i'm honored to begin the show tonight with martin luther king iii and reverend joseph lowry, who mean cal
on an airline in honolulu and flew to washington, d.c., and lands at dulles and actually gets an audience, let's say, peter king, or dianne feinstein. how do we think he would have been received if he had a private audience? we have seen how they reacted, they spin the truth, he would have been buried and we would have never known the truth. >> i know you haven't been in direct contact with your son, but what do you know about his condition right now? >> i'll say that having spoken with his russian attorney, he said he's safe. he obviously is exhausted. but he's now needing a period of time where he can recoup his energy level and reflect on what he wishes to do going forward. that's from his attorney. we hope to meet with him very soon, with edward in the next weeks. >> good luck. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> and the chairs of the foreign affairs committee, robert menendez, democrat, and republican congressman ed royce, the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. senator, let me begin with you, you heard this from lon snowden, and his attorney, they don't believe that ed
nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television show, this is "meet the press." >> good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous "i have a dream" speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secretary of the naacp, roy wilkins, appeared right here on "meet the press." many of you either already had the chance or will have the opportunity to see that special program as we have made it -- the original broadcast available to our nbc stations across the country. our roundtable joins us in just a moment. but first joining me now, the only living speaker from the march on washington, congressman john lewis. he spoke yesterday in front of the lincoln memorial. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way, make some noise! >> congressman lewis, welcome back to "meet the press." >> thank you very much, david, for having me. >> what a moment. we actually have the two
on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ballistic missiles into
the march on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ball
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in light of recent actions, we tried to give some time to the administration. they obviously tried to get the military government to not crack down in a violent way, to restore democracy, to move to elections, to release political prisoners. they have ignored all of those requests. and now with the recent violent crackdown, i do not see how we can continue aid. i believe it must be suspended because, unfortunately, i think the military's gotten the impression, and particularly with what the president not asking for aid to be suspended when he spoke this week, that whateve
on the washington debate. thank you both very much for your time this morning. >> thank you. >> let me bring in richard engel, our chief foreign correspondent, on the ground in cairo, as well as senior fellow at the woodrow wilson center, robin wright, an expert on the broader middle east for context here. richard, your reporting has been compelling from the chaotic streets of cairo. given your sense of things, where is this headed? >> reporter: well, i think a lot of it depends on what happens in washington. and just to continue on the debate you were just having, people in this country and around the region think it would be an absolutely disastrous idea for the united states to cut off aid, that washington has real interests with the egyptian military, preferential access to the suez canal, military overflights, and not to mention the camp david accords. the camp david accords brokered by the united states, the peace agreement between israel and egypt, says in principle that u.s. aid should be commensurate between israel, from washington to israel and from washington to egypt. and does th
want a friend in washington, get a dog. president obama did so this week with the addition of sunny, another portuguese water dog, companion to bo and one of the few bright spots in the dog days of summer. joining me today, correspondent for "the guardian" anna marie cox and former director of speech writing for the president -- i can't get the words out, i'm so excited, columnist for the daily beast and co-founder of fenway strategies, jon favreau and "washington post" columnist and msnbc political columnist eugene robinson. joining us now is chuck todd who is also, of course, host of msnbc's "the daily rundown." before we get into the actual policy here, i want to talk about the sort of bird's-eye view as far as what the president is doing on this great middle class tour if you will. to me it seems like he's trying to build up as much political capital as possible before he gets back to washington. what do you think he's trying to do? >> i think he's trying to talk about what people around kitchen tables are talking about, right? this has been the great disconnect of washington, s
. a front-page cover on the washington post the release say it all. an icon gone scooped up by a billionaire businessman. still unknown. but does he know what he is getting nto? it turns out less to say that he has been there, done that and tell with a lot of grief. he is not going about journalists like me, but it is righnow, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quartemillion tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollarare changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. ♪ >> big news, the founder of amazon is buying the washington post. >> the family has run the washington post for four generations, but that is coming to an end. >> a stunning announcement. amazons ceo je bezos is buying the washington post. >> the news was so big, and it was announced on the sticker on the "washington post" building. >> a sign of our changing world, news tha
. >>> meanwhile, a stunner the world of media, washington post selling the newspaper publishing businesses including amazon to jeff bezos, and julia boorstin has more on that blockbuster deal. >> this news took everyone including editors and writer at the post by surprise. the washington post's company whose name will change saw the stock rise with caplan tech being sold and now what the billionaire icon plans to do with the newspaper. jeff bezos stressed what a newspaper plays in a free society, and he says that the newspaper's duty remain s s to readers and not the owner. the charting of the map ahead is not going to be easy, and there is a need to invent, which means we will need to experiment. and after knowing each other for a decade, this came together in the conference last month. >> we met at a conference fa face-to-face twice. the second week in july. we spent an hour together, and he asked for time to study the numbers, and then we spent another two hour s together, an at the end he said he wanted to go ahead. >>> that is hardly the first billionaire to buy into publish i ing. th
speaker from the march on washington, congressman john lewis. he spoke yesterday in front of the lincoln memorial. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way, make some noise! >> congressman lewis, welcome back to "meet the press." >> thank you very much, david, for having me. >> what a moment. we actually have the two images. there you were 50 years ago as a 23-year-old speaking so powerfully and 50 years later an elder statesman, sir, if you don't mind ne saying. >> i don't mind. >> a pioneer of the civil rights struggle. that had to be quite a moment. >> it was a moving moment to stand there in the same spot 50 years later where dr. king and others stood. i think in the past 50 years we have witnessed what i'd like to call the nonviolent revolution in america, a revolution of values, a revolution of ideas, and our country is a better country. >> you know, the president will speak on wednesday in the same spot. he'll mark 50 years since the i have a dream speech. we've talked over the years, and you told me about a year
'm andrea mitchell in washington. state department is keeping 15 diplomatic posts closed for the rest of the week and closing four more today. joining me now from washington, nbc justice correspondent pete williams and from cairo, nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel. first to you, richard, in the field. we know we're talking about unspecified threats emanating from yemen and possibly targeting something in yemen but they don't know what the specific targets are. they don't know specifically the timing. what are you hearing in cairo and throughout the region? >> well, we're hearing confusing picture. we think we know a good amount about this threat. we know it is coming from yemen. we know it is coming from al qaeda and the iranian peninsula. we know that welcome and the iranian peninsula has some very dangerous, very important leaders who are tied directly to the top leadership of al qaeda central, including a man who was formerly osama bin laden's secretary. we know that there was chatter. but we don't know the most important things. exactly where, exactly when. so we've se
homeland security committee. analysis from ted koppel of nbc news and "the washington post's" barton gellman. then presidential orders. strong words from the commander in chief this week about stamping out sexual assault in the military. the pentagon is preparing new rules, but there is an agreement on how to end the crisis. i go one-on-one with one of the lawmakers pushing for change, missouri senator claire mccaskill. >>> the immigration debate. a critical time for reform as members of congress head back to their districts to prepare for the fall fight. what are the prospects for passage? talk to both sides including the congressmen leading the fight against reform. >>> end of an era. the venerable "the washington post" is sold to amazon's jeff bez bezos. was what does it say about the future of traditional media? inside analyst from "the washington post's" david ignatius and david gross of "the new york times". all of that ahead on me"meet th press" this sunday morning, august 11th. good sunday morning. president obama is on vacation, congress is out of town, and although we are i
news to tell you about after washington, following the first examination of the newborn panda. the tiny cub got off to a healthy start. the animal showed vibrant signs of life. at the end of the ten-minute exam vets were happy to learn the newborn has a steady heartbeat and functioning organs. a second exam is scheduled for tomorrow. >>> here is the first look at this morning's scrambled politics. ruth gader ginsburg vows to stay on the court, calling it one of the most activist courts in history. suzanna martinez and west virginia congresswoman shelly mark ped dough are two of the prominent women leaders mentioned by a new super pac. recruiting more republican women to run for office. >>> thousands rallied in washington saturday for the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. john lewis talked about what it was like before that historic march. >> when i first came to washington in 1961, the same year that president barack obama was born to go on freedom rides, black people and white people couldn't be seated on a bus or a train together to travel through the south. >> former
and jobs come back. >> we have seen this in new york city and washington, d.c. if you take an area and turn it in a place with business and people employ and have jobs to get young people in workplace to keep them busy it's very important. going to the arguement that juan has made all week, the kids from the single parent homes are likely to live in poverty and commit crimes. this costs us money in lives and dollars. >> eric: juan, if you apply to this horrific killing that happened outside of oklahoma city, where three young people shot someone for fun, how does it apply? >> these are teenagers. one father in the courtroom said my son could haven't done it. wake up, dude. c'mon. we have kids online, spewing all kind of hateful messages. no structure around them. they are bore and think it's okay to tracksome somebody like an animal and kill them. sick. >> eric: important word that juan used. they were "bored." that's because they weren't working. >> true. >> you have to get them involved, too. i don't care, it could be community work. you could do anything. it requires some kind of leaders
, nicolle wallace. >> she's great. >> she's amazing. msnbc contributor mike barnicle. and in washington, pulitzer-prize winning columnist and associate editor of the -- >> amazon -- >> newly sold "washington post," wow, big news there, in your world, gene. we'll talk about that. >> no free shipping for you, mika. >> he's like the free shipping czar now. >> my goodness. none for me. >> all right. mike barnicle, this is like a big day -- >> mike, this is huge. >> this is. >> this is -- >> i was surprised. >> as willie was saying last night at the holiday inn, the plates are shifting under the media world and then we had a couple smokes and watched old reruns of "night of a thousand". >> you ran out of cigarettes before i got there. >> one pack talking about the globe, another pack -- >> the sale of the post as i'm sure gene will have more to say on this, it was stunning. >> it's an earthquake. >> stunning. >> but no family, few families who have owned newspapers have been better at it and more honorable at it than the graham family and i choose to think donnie graham and the waymouth aspe
look for answers at the seats of power. washington where they don't want our camera around but there's so much moneyh here goo life is good. >> once people come to washington d.c. they never leave. >> from the fox news headquarters in new york york, john stossel. >> we stop with this because americans are so fat it is government's job to help us eat better.ab >> changing all hold have this is not easy the first lady says to change behaviorov >> government has to do its p part is michelle obama wantse to inspire us to exercise ofpi the white house lawn, that is great but that usually means force but simply the size of the cup could be used. >> might mayor is upset about big cups of soda heth wants this size made it illegal. >> it is the biggest step to curb obesity. >> please. i could fill two of these or2 i could go to the supermarket to buy one of. these. how does this curb obesity? he is also proud he has forced every chain restaurant to clearly postlear >> there were more than a few skeptics but most arel recognized as national models. >> sadly that is true now b they all have to
're always adding burdens, who is we, washington, when they don't let a camera around. there is so much money here, life is good >> john: we start with myth number 7 because americans are so fat it's government's job to help us eat better. >> changing old habits is never easy. >> john: no, it's not. so the first lady says to change behavior. >> it's going to take government doing its part. >> john: if michelle obama wants to inspire us by exercising on the white house lawn, that is great but with government it's force. >> this is not banning what you are buying but simply the size of the cup that can be used. >> john: in my hometown, they are upset about big cups of soda. they want big cups illegal. >> this is biggest thing to curb obesity. >> john: i can buy two of these, that is 32 ounces around i can buy one of these. how does this curb obesity? >> my mayor is proud he has forced every chain restaurant to clearly post calorie koont. >> there were few skeptics but nowhey are national models. >> john: that sadly that true. under obamacare all big chains will have to post calorie counts even
in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwilling to militarily intervene in syria, despite the deaths of more than 100,000 people and a vow he made more than one year ago. >> that's a red line for us. and that there would be enormous consequences if we start seeing movement on the chemical weapons front. >> with that line possibly crossed, senator john mccain
. good morning from washington. it's august 26, 2013. this "the daily rundown." my first reads of the morning. the obama administration is stepping up plans for military action against syria put together the international coalition the white house says is needed for a strike. every action the president took this weekend, whether it was saturday's meeting with his national security team or round of phone calls to u.s. allies suggest it's less a question of if than when. options on the table include cruise missile strikes from navy destroyers and submarines in the mediterranean. bombs could be launched from u.s. fighter jets without actually entering syrian airspace. targeting syrian command and control or airfields from which chemical attacks could be launched. today, u.n. chemical weapons experts begin their inspection of the suburban damascus towns where doctors without borders estimate that at least 355 people were killed and more than 3,600 injured by a chemical attack last week. the u.n. spokesman says the inspectors were deliberately shot at multiple times as they proceede
from washington with a preview. what about these new proposals do we expect to hear from the president? >> we expect him to talk about saving money. the real focus is going to be the middle class. and part of that is going to be restructuring how we do mortgages, trying to prevent the collapse of a freddie mac and fannie mae that we saw over the last several years and putting a lot more private money behind mortgages. he's also going to talk about the white house says saving $3,000 per family by making it easier to get mortgages and easier to refinance. for example, wiping out closing costs. if you re-fi to a lower term. what's significant here is where he's saying it. going back to arizona where he first addressed this issue four years ago. >> thank you. >>> and now here is your first look at this morning's dish of scrambled politics. here's something you don't hear every day. a politician being open about their future plans. wendy davis did that monday while addressing the national press club. >> i can say with absolute certainty that i will run for two offices. either the state sena
. >> stirring words and a call to action. will this march on washington affect change, especially when it comes to voting rights? the burden of history, what should the president say to the nation this week? 50 years after martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech. in florida, the saga of a teenage girl and her underage love interest takes a new twist. we'll tell you what she did that landed her in jail. >>> hello, everyone, it's high noon in the east and 9:00 in the west. i'm mara schiavocampo in for alex witt. >>> developing news out of syria right now, the syrian government reached an agreement with the united nations to allow inspectors to visit the site of an alleged chemical attack last week. word just a short time ago from a u.n. spokesman saying inspections will begin tomorrow. a senior white house official tells nbc news the decision by the syrian government is, quote, too late to be credible and says any evidence has likely been damaged or destroyed by continued bombings. meanwhile, the syrian government warned that any military intervention by the united states would set the middl
of the communication structure remains shrouded in mystery. tom foreman, washington. >> of course the great irony using so much american innovation to try to destroy america. >>> our tourt fourth story outfront, dr. sanjay gupta changes his mind on weed. 20 states allow medical marijuana. and the medical community seems to be changing its mind on pot. but you know, not everybody is. a lot are adamantly against it. but there is a dramatic turn around for dr. gupta who just four years ago wrote an article for "time" magazine titled why i would vote no for pot. the ground breaking new documentary airing this sunday on cnn. and in it, he explained why he changed his mind. sanjay, the fda says marijuana is harmful, we know that. michael bloomberg is quoted saying medical marijuana is the greatest hoax of all time. you were in that camp, right? you agreed. you looked at the evidence, and i remember a few weeks ago saying i have this documentary coming up, and i think the government is reprehensible for not allowing pot. >> i'm surprised by both mayor bloomberg's comments and how long the government has been
. thanu for being with us. washington has become an ent mow logical wonderland for the obama administration seems to be more obsessed with semantics and sentence con trucks than to capture a killing of terrorists. washington -- while dismissing any sense of proportion when it comes to radical islamists and the war on terror. and for all of that, this was a red letter day. president obama's mantra that al qaeda is on the run today proved wrong yet again. you are looking at pictures of yemen where government officials uncovered an al qaeda plot to capture oil and gas facilities, to fire on foreign embassies, to seize -- news of the foiled plot breaking as the united states is stepping up its drone attacks there. killing at least seven al qaeda terrorists in the southern part of the country. in the broader plot that led to the closings of 19 embassies and facilities and 16 countries still acted tonight with no indication that the threats have in any way diminished. here is state department spokesperson jen saki on the closings and the alerts. >> our embassy remains closed. we're
's bring in former state department spokesman p.j. crowley and michael crowley and washington post diplomatic correspondent ann biernan. thank you all for being here. p.j., i want to start with you and this announcement by president obama that washington is canceling the joint military operations. how significant is that decision? does it carry any weight whatsoever? >> i'm sure it will be heard loud and clear by the egyptian military. how they respond to that, we'll have to see. i think the administration's challenge right now is not only what message it sends to the egyptian military, of course the president again decided not to tinker with the existing military assistance, but also what message do you send to the muslim brotherhood. do they have a mounting list of grievances. of course, the policy objective is to return to inclusive democracy. the real challenge over the next several weeks is how do you entice the muslim brotherhood that's been the victim of a coup and violence back into the political process. the end result is stronger than what was overthrown six months ago. >
. obama can be. >> heckled over health care and questioned about his citizenship. why is "the washington post" targeting senator ted cruz. wasn't the post upset about so-called birthers questioning president obama. nina easton and brad blakeman join us on the left wing media assault on ted cruz. when i first felt the diabetic nerve pain, of course i had no idea what it was. i felt like my feet were going to sleep. it progressed from there to burning... to like 1,000 bees that were just stinging my feet. [ female announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause rious allergic reactions or suicidal thoughts or actions. tell your doctor right ay if you have ese, new or rsening depression, or unusual changes in md or behavior. orwelling, trouble breathing, rash, hives, blisters, changes in eyesight including blurry vision, muscle pain with fever, tired feeling, or skin sores friabetes. common side effects are dizziness, sleepiness, weight gain and swling of hands, legs and ft. don't ink alcohol
not a political dispute but more interesting, the ambassador to washington came out with that statement that the egyptian government was trying or at least going to review the u.s. aid and that certainly caught a lot of people here by surprise. in recent days the egyptian government has been trying to assert more of its sovereignty. it's one of the things it's criticized for, over the years it was seen that it was somewhat of a lap dog on the u.s. government's hand because the former regime of hosni mubarak was so closely allied to washington. this government is trying to distance itself from any type of foreign interference particularly those critical of its actions. when it comes to those governments that have been very close or supporting the government's crackdown they have been welcoming them and that's caught some people here by surprise. another point that caught people here off guard was the reference to the fact hat the united states and the taliban have both expressed reservations in terms of what is happening here on the ground and that was a point that the foreign minister a
with a predictably defensive editorial by mayor michael bloomberg in the "washington post" in which the mayor took turns defending stop and frisk and attacking the "washington post," itself, and others were criticizing the practice saying "the men and women who protect our city from criminals and terrorists deserve better than to have their integrity impugned in a courtroom or a newspaper especially when the facts are so clearly on their side." even today speaking at a press conference, touting the largest gun seizure in new york history, both men looked to play up the role of stop and frisk in getting guns off the street. >> wiretap conversations from this investigation show that one of the gun traffickers' biggest concerns was stop, question, frisk. >> campbell didn't want to risk it being found by new york police and is heard saying, "yeah. i'm in charlotte now. i can't take them to my house, to my side of town, in brownsville. we got, like, watchamacallit, stop and frisk." >> mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly doubling down and repeating the same statements again and again over stop and fr
>> schieffer: today on "face the nation," 50 years after the march on washington, has martin luther king's dream come true? >> they marched on washington today. the one day while the congress, the country, and the world watched, they took over the nation's capital in the name of civil rights. what was its impact on the real washington-- that is, the washington that governs the united states of america? in the lead, martin luther king, the man hailed today above all the others. >> i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream. >> schieffer: today, we'll talk about king's dream and the state of race relations with some prominent american american leaders, including former secretary of state colin powell, and legendary civil rights leader, georgia congressman, john lewis, who was with king that day. plus we'll hear general powell's advice to the president on the crisis in the middle east. >> in both egypt and syria, america has to take a much more-- much more clever role. >> schieffer: we'll also talk about the situation in syria with jack reed
, and the creation of a task force of private citizens. joining me this morning barton gellman of "the washington post" who has been writing extensively about edward snowden and the nsa, special correspondent for nbc news ted koppel, and the chairman of the house homeland security committee, republican congressman mike mccaul. barton gellman, let me start with you. has edward snowden won? has he accomplished what he set out to do, which is not only get a debate going but force change in these programs? >> he has accomplished far more than anyone in his position could have reasonably hoped to have accomplished. he told me his greatest fear was that he would come out and do this and whole story would be -- you know, roiling around for a day and it would be gone. now you have president obama being forced to say that he welcomes the debate, which he welcomes sort of like the ceo who gets an angry letter yet writes back and says thank you for your interest in our surveillance programs. but it's top of the ageneral da for two months. >> the president spoke out about snowden during his press conference
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